Reset

A female android discovers she has feelings for her owner and must put her life on the line to gain a human connection.

Produced with a grant awarded by bravoFACT (Foundation to Assist Canadian Talent), a division of Bell Media Inc.

Creative team

Writer: Ryan Bright
Director: Jeremy Lutter
Producers: Arnold Lim, Jocelyn Russell

Filmmaker’s statement

Reset started at an award show for a film festival where I met soon to be award-winning writer, Ryan Bright. We both had films in the festival and started chatting.

My previously successful short films have been about family themes, but this is mostly because my writer friend Ben Rollo wrote them (Joanna Makes a Friend and Gord’s Brother) and he doesn’t typically write a story with a protagonist over 11 years of age.

Ryan – who had noticed this trend in my filmography – remarked in the middle of our conversation over the snack table at the awards gala, “You don’t want to get pigeonholed as a family filmmaker, do you?”

This comment caught me off guard. I thought, “I don’t know. Do I?” I certainly never set out to be known for that. I also thought those films had a bit of a dark edge to them. He then suggested that he had just the breakout project for me called Reset.

I asked him to send me the script. He did and, when I read it, my first thought was this is the exact opposite of anything I had ever made. I loved it. The script touched on themes of loneliness, technology, love, objectification and what it means to be human.

I thought it was a story set in the future but also very much about the problems we are facing today. I agreed to look for financing to get the script made. I pitched a fund in Canada called BravoFACT that funds short films and we won a grant and – thanks to the kind people at Bell Media – we made this amazing short film.

In short, I made the film because it was a story I thought needed to be told now and it was outside my comfort zone as a filmmaker.

To me, Reset is a film about loneliness. All the characters are lonely and struggle with it in different ways. I have spent most of my life feeling lonely and trying to fill a void inside myself. I have even tried to use technology to fill the gap. When I was younger, I would search for people online. The relationships I built were interesting but not very grounded.

They were human relationships without ever being in the same room, but what if it was the opposite – a non-human relationship but with someone or something that is real. Can we replace these human connections with technology? What does that mean for us?

About Jeremy Lutter

Jeremy Lutter

Measuring in at a height of six feet seven inches tall, Jeremy understands the benefit of standing out in a crowd. He studied creative writing in his hometown at the University of Victoria. Since graduating, his work has been seen on The Movie Network, MuchMusic, MTV, CBC, Bravo!, TV Italy, Air Canada and screened at festivals around the world.

Jeremy pitched the MPPIA Short Film Award at the 2010 Whistler Film Festival and won funding and in-kind services to make a short film called Joanna Makes a Friend. That film was a huge success and went on to screen at over 20 film festivals worldwide, winning several awards including the audience choice award at both TIFF Kids and Victoria Film Festival.

Telefilm Canada took notice and presented Joanna Makes a Friend at the Cannes Film Market as a part of their Not Short on Talent program in 2012. The film stars Dalila Bela and Fred Ewanuick (Dan For Mayor, Corner Gas).

Jeremy has made a series of award-winning short films over over the years. Through the NSI Drama Prize program and BravoFACT with filmmaker Daniel Hogg, they made a short film called Floodplain which stars Cameron Bright (Twilight, X-Men, Thank You for Smoking) and Sarah Desjardins.

The Harold Greenberg Fund’s Short to Feature launched his next project, Gord’s Brother, about a young boy and his monster brother. The film is written by longtime friend and Joanna Makes a Friend writer Ben Rollo.

Jeremy’s first feature, the Telefilm Canada-funded horror thriller The Hollow Child, premiered earlier this year.

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