Tengri

Wind burial, influenced by Shamanism, is an old Mongolian tradition.

When someone dies, the corpse is carried on a cart until a bump causes the body to fall. The place where the body lands becomes a simple tomb.

Creative team

Writer/director/producer: Alisi Telengut

Filmmaker’s statement

Tengri is about the wind burial, a traditional Mongolian ritual that is deeply rooted in the Shamanic belief. When a person dies, the wind spirit will guide the person’s soul to ascend, ultimately to the cradle of father heaven (Tengri).

Tengri is a Turkic word which refers not only to the holy, blue sky but also the primary deity of nature that has been worshipped by Mongolic and Turkic peoples. It compromises Shamanism, Animism and other spiritual practices that connect people, spirits and nature together.

I grew up under the influences of my grandparents who lived as Mongolian nomads and they told me lots of stories and legends about nomadic life. Since this particular lifestyle is gradually disappearing, I want to record the nomadic traditions with animation as my medium.

About Alisi Telengut

Alisi Telengut

Alisi Telengut, born in 1989, is an artist and filmmaker currently based in Montreal.

She creates animation frame by frame under the camera, with painting as the medium, to generate movement and explore hand-made and painterly visuals for her films.

She is interested in the notions of visual poetry, lyrical representations of memory and experimental ethnography.

Her recent films received awards at the Stockholm International Film Festival, the 36th and the 37th Montreal World Film Festival and Canada International Film Festival.

In addition to being selected at TIFF, Cannes (Talent tout court), Slamdance, Florida, Edinburgh, ZINEBI and various worldwide film venues and exhibitions as animation and moving image artworks, her films have also contributed to enthnographic, ethnocultural and archaeological research archives.

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